About your Search

20100101
20100131
STATION
FOXNEWS 28
CSPAN 14
CNN 5
MSNBC 5
WMPT (PBS) 3
CNBC 2
CSPAN2 1
HLN 1
WBFF (FOX) 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
WTTG 1
LANGUAGE
English 63
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)
from medicare over ten years the cbo said that course of action would reduce the deficit by more than $130 billion. >> there is a number of things that make that implausible, dubious. >> such as expanding medicaid, shifting some cost to cash-strapped states or double counting savings in medicare, by saying they'd extend the life of the program, but also spending the money elsewhere. >> you it wi literally can't sp the same dollar twice. it won't work. >> then there is the doctor fix in medicare, a move to undo the previous effort to reduce medicare spending. under the current law, dockerors seeing the elderly will have a fee cut next year. they were worried about the effect so they removed it from the reform bill. >> the biggest hole in financing they left out the doc fix. >>> if it were counted the bill shifts from reducing the deficit to make it worse because the doc fix would cost $210 billion. congress still has to fix it anyway, so the house passed it separately, but simply added the cost to the deficit, which troubles democratic centrists. >> the question is how will that be fin
: if you're over 65, have diabetes and are on medicare... vo: ...call now and we'll send you a free meter. vo: it offers alternate site testing, so you can test on your arm. no more pricking your fingers. vo: and to make it even less painful, the cost of your diabetes testing supplies may be covered by medicare. vo: join over a million others who have chosen liberty medical. vo: call now and receive a free accu-chek aviva meter. vo: plus, for a limited time, get a free cookbook when you join. end tag vo: call the number on your screen. . >>> this is my first "insomniac theater." it's good to be here. >> that's why it made it easier to sit through the chick flick. you saw the wrong one. i saw the edgy movie people are talking about, "youth in revolt." let me set up the movie for you. it's basically adapted from a series of favorite cult books. the idea behind it is sair ray is a 16-year-old virgin who falls head over heels for a nonvirgin. she's encouraging him to be bad and do daring things. he decides he's going to create an altear ego named francois and it gets him into a lot of trouble
and think it's a terrible proposal. it's gonna cut medicare, raise taxes and insurance premiums they want us to stop it. all of a sudden they realize there's an election where we can have an impact on it. quite a phenomenon. >> brit: let's assume the election is held and brown is the apparently winner, republican brown. what does that mean for the term in office of paul kirk the interim senator, the democrat serving out the balance of senator kennedy's -- late senator kennedy's term? does his term end on the day of the election so that whether the new senator's seated or not, do you not? >> interesting academic question. what we have to do is wait until the election is held and focus on that first step is to see what the people of massachusetts say tuesday. then everybody will be looking at the pros says after that >> brit: is there any doubt in your mind that the winner, if it's brown would be sworn in promptly? in time to vote on the next -- in the next round of votes on health care? >> the winner whoever it is, should be sworn in promptly, there are ways democrats could interrupt that pro
these are some of the hearings we had. medicare advantage which you'll hear about tonight. predatory sales practice. may 15, 2008, we did nursing home standards. we passed the nursing home standard law 25 years ago. never had a hearing on it. we had the first one. long-term care insurance, our consumers -- are consumers protected? june 16, termination of individual health insurance policies. you buy an individual family polcy, you fill out an application, right? we had two hearings on this. our investigation took us about 18 months into this. when you fill out your insurance policy, there's most insurance companies have about 1,400 different codes. you go to the local drugstore you fill out your prescription, you run it through the insurance company. if you trigger one of those 1,00 codes, they'll probably go through and review your policy because what this code triggered was it might be very expensive medical treatment you'll face in the future and therefore they are going to dump you off your insurance if they can and they do it under thing called rescission. for instance, one family, th
's developed and directed a number of national programs, including the center for medicare education, the better jobs, better care national program, funded by the robert wood johnson foundation and atlantic philanthropy. she was a political appointee during the clinton administration, serving in the u.s. department of health and human services as deputy assistant secretary for disability, aging and long-term care policy. she also was assistant secretary for aging in 1997. she's been a senior researcher at the national center for health services research, and at project hope center for health healthy communities fares previously, as well as -- health affairs previously, as well as at georgetown university. to begin, let's welcome to the podium, steven kay. >> some people focus on specific federal programs, or they might focus on quality issues or work force issues or family care giving, and they also tend to focus on specific population, such as the so-called frail elderly, on non-elderly people with disabilities or cognitive disabilities. as carol levine said in her article in this i
at the healthcare bill and think it's a terrible proposal, that is going to cut medicare and raise taxes and raise insurance premiums. they want us to stop it. all of a sudden they realize there is an election somewhere in the country where you can effect -- where you can have an impact on it. so it's quite a phenomena. >> let's assume that the election is held and brown is the apparent winner, republican brown. when does that mean for the term in office of paul kirk who is the interim senator, the democrat serving out the balance of senator kennedy's, late senator kennedy's term? does his term end on the day of the election so that whether the in senator is seated or not? do you know? >> it's an interesting academic question. what we have to do is wait until the election is held and then focus on that. the first step is see what the people of massachusetts say on tuesday and then everybody will be looking at the proto ses for swearing in the new senator after that. >> is there any doubt in your mind the winner, if it's brown, would be sworn in promptly, in time to vote on the next, in the next ro
- term liabilities is medicare, medicaid, and health care spending. nothing comes close. social security would probably fix the same way to and ronald reagan sat down together and could figure something out. that is manageable. medicare and medicaid are a massive problem down the road. that is going to be what our children have to worry about. paul's approach, i want to be careful to not simplify this because i know you have a lot of detail in your plan, but i understand it to say that we will provide doctors of some sort for current medicare recipients at the current level. 55 and over. there is a grandfathering in for future beneficiaries. i just want to point out that i have read it. the basic idea is that at some point, we hold medicare costs per recipient constant as a way of making sure that it does not go way out of black. i am sure there are some details -- we hold medicare costs per recipient constant as a way of making sure that it does not have things going out of wahack. it has to be reformed for the younger generations because it is going bankrupt. why not give people the sa
has a sweetheart deal to let people out of medicare advantage. he has a deal for a number of counties in florida. 13 different democrat senators have said, we want something special for us. harry reid said if you didn't get something special for you, you are not doing a good job. >> greta: did any republican senator get any special care in this health care bill? >> not that i saw. i think the bill is terrible and i think the republicans uniformly saw that, it raises taxes, cuts medicare and it is going to cause families in america to have their premiums go up and even the medicare people say that >> greta: do you believe that senator ben nelson we he accepted his 300 million, do you believe he was thinking that every state should and would get that? >> no, not at all. >> greta: what is that? >> winston churchill would have called it a term logical inexactitude. he to come up with something that's the best he could come up with. he said on the principle of where he stood on federal funding and abortion. then he gives into language not the language that people who feel that way wanted.
looked at this health care bill and think it's a terrible proposal. it's gonna cut medicare, raise taxes and insurance premiums they want us to stop it. all of a sudden they realize there's an election where we can have an impact on it. quite a phenomenon. >> brit: let's assume the election is held and brown is the apparently winner, republican brown. what does that mean for the term in office of paul kirk the interim senator, the democrat serving out the balance of senator kennedy's -- late senator kennedy's term? does his term end on the day of the election so that whether the new senator's seated or not, do you not? >> interesting academic question. what we have to do is wait until the election is held and focus on that first step is to see what the people of massachusetts say tuesday. then everybody will be looking at the pros says after that >> brit: is there any doubt in your mind that the winner, if it's brown would be sworn in promptly? in time to vote on the next -- in the next round of votes on health care? >> the winner whoever it is, should be sworn in promptly, there are way
, and the last three, social security, medicare and medicaid, those three make up about 59 percent of all federal spending each year. they wouldn't be touched by this freeze. it's just the 17 percent of the budget that's the government agencies and programs and departments. trace: molly henneberg, live for us on the north lawn of the white house, thank you. as always, we want to hear from you, log on to foxnews.com and on the home page you'll see our you decide questions of the day. one of the them asks if you think a partial spending freeze is a good idea. click on the question and see the answer choices and click one of them to register your vote. you can also see how other people are answering by clicking the view results tab. it's all right there on foxnews.com. >> also an foxnews.com right now, if you wanted to hear the rest of that press briefing with robert gibbs, that's also an foxnews.com. >>> meanwhile two strong aftershocks rocking port-au-prince haiti, today, our fox team on the ground tells us the tremors felt moderately strong, strong enough to give them a scare and those aftershock
taxes cut a half trillion from medicare affect veterans care i think we can do it better to be the 41st center and bring -- senator and bring it back to the drawing bore if you look at -- really almost a parochial manner we need to look out for massachusetts first. i've felt as a legislator and citizen i felt we haven't done that well. we've always thought about maybe washington first or the party first. the thing that i'm hearing throughout the state is, what about us? i was asked many times what kind of republican i would be? i didn't know how to answer that so i said i'm going to be a scott brown republican. maybe there's a new breed of republican coming to washington. somebody not beholding to the special interests of the party and will look to just to solve problems. i've always been that way. you remember, i supported clean elections. i'm a self-imposed term limits person. i believe strongly we are there to serve the people. we are there to do a . i, like many others throughout the country, when we're talking about what so and so said in his book and what so and so said here. my r
, it will raise taxes, it will hurt medicare, it will destroy jobs and run our nation deeper into debt. >> welcome back to "hardball" live from doyle's cafe in boston. what is that republican victory for scott brown in massachusetts mean? joining me now political analyst lawrence o'donnell. if you were back here advises these senators, how auto would you do it? >> my advice was always confidential. i don't see any way you go forward from here with health care. now i'm not saying they can't do it. i've run bills through the senate in reconciliation. i've done them without reconciliation that needed 60-vote thresholds to get over. i know every procedure that's available now. i don't know one that can work. within the reconciliation procedure, what everyone always forgets that every single day, usually several times a day, there are 60 vote thresholds that you have to clear. these are parliamentary procedural thresholds that get thrown inside the reconciliation process and, yes, you only need 51 at the end and you don't need a closure vote to get to that 51, but you have several procedural votes that
along the party line on cap and trade and obama care and higher taxes and cutting medicare. they are going to say no to does things. i think when the politicking time comes they are going to say i don't think i want to invite barack obama to come into my district, he does not make things happen. >> sean: amazing turn around one year ago think of where we were in the country. there's been talk about how this impacts health care. nancy pelosi said earlier today that health care will go for. other congressmen says it does not. then there's talk about she nan agains that they won't seat brown right away if he has the victory tonight if they play any shenanigans what does that do to the mood of the electorate, which is clearly pretty angry and pretty anti-the democrats' agenda? >> i would be surprised, the democrats have been talking what they would do if scott brown became elected how they would get their health care through despite the will of the people. if they play the kind of she nan -- shenanigans you described it will show the arrogance which has lead to brown's victory
. and what it doesn't cover r can cost you some money. that's why you should consider... an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan... insured by united healthcare insurance company. it can help cover some of what medicare doesn't... in out-of-pocket expenses. call now for this free information kit... and edicare guide., if you're turning 65 or you're already on medicare, you should know about this card; it's the only one of its kind... that carries the aarp name -- see if it's right for you. you hoose your doctor. you choose your hospital. there are o networks and no.referrals needed. save up to thousands of dlars... on potential out-of-pocket expenses... with an aarp medicare .supplement insurance plan... insured by united healthcare insurance company. call now for your free information kit... how ou ould start saving. >>> that's our show for today. it's my last regular sunday here at "this week." thanks to all of you for watching so faithfully for all these years. thanks to the outstanding crew these years. thanks to the outstanding crew and staff here at "t you can see it on their fac
to go to a certain facility, this case first before medicare pays. it is fair. they are still providing a roof over your head and other things. quality is another issue. the second piece is if you use a home community-based option with medicaid and the package of options in the state include the tough stuff such as desisted technology, transportation, personal assistance. -- assisted technology, transportation, personal assistance. you still need $1,500 to do other things in your house. whatever your acute bonus injury is, this is on top of it. that is how we try to leave this. the last beasley tried to do is swear senator kennedy had been all wrong. this was never meant to put certain people out of business. we did a lot of exploration as to where this has been our of the last few years and where they are right now. they need a jump-start in order to work. this program is not the end all be all. it is to go together with the long-term care products that are out there. we had the five years in here for a reason. it was to make sure that the government that the participation they needed.
senator ben nelson? apparently he is asking for money for his state that would be used for medicare and he's asking not to take it anymore? guest: this was done essentially to get senator nelson's vote. it was to expand federal funding for medicare in nebraska. some said great, but what about our state? senator nelson took a lot of heat for this. he's a conservative leaning democrat in a strongly republican state. he's gone around the state and done all kinds of ads to explain his position, and finally he said to senator reed, let's take this off the table. he said let's give it to all states or take it out entirely. host: wlats going on in massachusetts -- with what's going on in massachusetts, how long until he could be sworn into the senate? guest: this is a matter of contention. you haveçó democratic-leaning officials in massachusetts saying it may take two weeks to officially process the win. thers÷ tradition in the senate it is not disputed, you get that person in there as quickly as possible. i can bet republicans would be crying foul if democrats tried to string this out and lea
this historical legislation. it is right alongside such security and medicare. -- social security and medicare. >> in number of moderates have said [inaudible] what changes are critical? >> we want our final product to ensure affordability to the middle cows, accountability for the insurance companies, and by lowering costs for every stage. those of the standards that we have. >> [inaudible] >> i prefer to call and the public's options. we want to increase competition. there are ways to do that. we look forward to having those discussions as to reconcile the bill. unless the whole the insurance counties -- companies accountability, we will not have affordability for the middle class. we need to end discrimination on the basis of pre-existing conditions, to cap payments and co-payments. it is about affordability. that is essential to accessibility. we will have what we need to hold the insurance companies accountable. i contend that whatever we have coming out of this bill, we will hold them accountable. there will be crying out. -- they will be crying out. >> [inaudible] right now there has be
assistance getting around their homes. there is a medicare benefit that may qualify you for a new power chair or scooter at little or no cost to you. imagine... one scooter or power chair that could improve your mobility and your life. one medicare benefit that, with private insurance, may entitle you to pay little to nothing to own it. one company that can make it all happen ... your power chair will be paid in full. the scooter store. hi i'm doug harrison. we're experts at getting you the power chair or scooter you need. in fact, if we qualify you for medicare reimbursement and medicare denies your claim, we'll give you your new power chair or scooter free. i didn't pay a penny out of pocket for my power chair. with help from the scooter store, medicare and my insurance covered it all. call the scooter store for free information today. >> shannon: there's one report saying the arctic will be without nice a matter of decades. whether global warming is to blame sauls a heated subject. former astronaut has seen the polar icecaps from outer space he joins us with a different perspective. welcom
it doesn't cover can cost you some money. that's why you should consider... an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan... insured by united healthcare insurance company. it can help cover some of what medicare doesn't... so you could save up to thousands of dollars... in out-of-pocket expenses. call now for this free information kit... and medicare guide. if you're turning 65 or you're already on medicare, you should know about this card; it's the only one of its kind... that carries the aarp name -- see if it's right for you. you choose your doctor. you choose your hospital. there are no networks and no referrals needed. help protect yourself from some of what medicare doesn't cover. save up to thousands of dollars... on potential out-of-pocket expenses... with an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan... insured by united healthcare insurance company. call now for your free information kit... and medicare guide and find out... how you could start saving. >>> there's a look at futures after we got the citigroup numbers about 25 minutes ago. we have erased some of our losses, but it's
the center for medicare education, the better jobs better care of national program. she was a political appointee during the clinton administration, serving in the department of health and human services. she also was assistant secretary for aging in 1997. she is been a senior researcher for health services research and project hope center for health affairs previously. to begin, but welcome to the podium. let's welcome him to the podium. >> people tend to view long-term care through a particular lands, depending on what they are interested in. some people focus on specific federal programs. they might focus on quality issues or workforce issues. they also tend to focus on specific populations of elderly. as carol levine said in her article, the whole is often eclipsed by a separate part. this article is an attempt to paint a picture of that hole, although i realize there are plenty of my own biases in it. we include people receiving long-term care from public programs, from family members, from private paid workers, whether they live in the community or institutions, whether they are e
from, you know, the senate version where ben nelson took $100 million medicare and medicaid payoff and decided to sign on the dotted line. how does it get there the house now? >> well, i hope that bart stupak remains stalworth. the problem with so many moderate democrats we have seen them fold every time. ben nelson did. now he has a huge backlash from his constituents. not just on the bribery part, but also on the abortion funding part of it as well. he's retreating. he's saying now he's saying oh, i think everybody should get the same deal i did. how are they going to pay for that on top of that? how is it going to get through? well, of course, the democrats who are in full freak-out mode are gaming this all out. it's possible that the senate might try to force the house to swallow what they put through. so they could expedite it on the timeline. but i think another thing that people have to worry about here is what is going on, on the ground, in massachusetts over this weekend? we talked about the unions, the service employees international union. they will be putting at least 3
a sweetheart deal to let people out of medicare advantage there. is a sweetheart deal for a number of counties in florida. 13 different senators said we want something special for us. and said if you didn't get it you're not doing a good job. >> did any republican senator get a special deal in this bill? >> not that i saw. i think the bill is terrible and republicans uniformly saw that. which is why all 40 of us voted against it. it raises taxes and going to cause families in america to have their premium goes up. >> do you believe that senator ben nelson when he accepted his $300 million deal, do you believe that he, at the time was thinking every state should and would get that? >> no. >> that is -- what is that? what is that? >> winston churchhill would have called it. >> this is like, he's come up with this now. >> well, you laugh. >> he had to come up with something that. inteft he can come up with. he said he's going to withhold the vote on the principle of where he stood on federal funding and abortion. then, all of a sudden gives into language that is not the language people wanted and
don't put a mandate on businesses not going to create jobs. you don't cut medicare put the cost on the backs of seniors. everything about this bill is wrong-headed that's why i think the american people are going to reject those that are sponsors of it. >> greta: we've had the discussion many times here on the record i said people think this bill is lousy, say next november in the midterm elections, i suppose two years later the voters will take it out on those who voted for. here's the problem, he will have the bill at that point unless we try to make it better now. do you have any recommendation to try to fix it, pervade -- persuade some of your ideas into this new bill or are we stuck with what is handed us? >> as we are invited to sit at the table with democrats and do it properly. there's been a lot learned, problems to avoid, tunes that exist. there's a real need for health care reform in this country that isn't what is going on now this is about politics not about helping the american people with a better health care bill many if people are serious about focusing on healt
a deal that i think is unworkable for a medicare advantage in florida didn't apply anywhere else in the country or any new floridians after this year. if you go through the senate bill with a fine tooth comb it is staggering how many special deals there were. part of way the secret negotiation is wrong. we have no idea what is in, what is out, what has been added to this bill in these secret negotiations in the white house. >> greta: that statement didn't help. i'm going to post it on greta wire. any way, mr. speaker, thank you. next senator mccain accuses democrats of unsavory chicago-style backroom politics, ouch! that's just the beginning. senator mccain on health care, next. . get senator mccain right here and right now. on the table health care. senator nice to see you, sir! >> thank you greta, nice to be with you. >> greta: before we get into the discussion about health care which is dominating much of the national buzz and talk. i want to talk to you about haiti. what do you recommend? what can we do to help the people of haiti? it is absolutely catastrophic what has happe
in the room. that's wrong. especially when you are looking at 50 billion dollars cuts in medicare, 500 billion dollars cuts in medicare, 8% tax increases, people that do have a health care plan, they want to tax them this is wrong. we need people to have the benefit of seeing what is going on behind closed doors. no secret deals. >> greta: congressman, i know you need the 218 votes, are you willing to tell us who refused to sign it? i guess we can figure it out. any specific people? some may try to dodge you and avoid you. can we get the names of those who flat out say no? >> yeah, you can go to buchanan.house.government, we got 88 members yesterday. go to my website, and look who has signed and who hasn't. and who hasn't, especially we need conservative democrats. if we can get the 218 we'll get c pan in the room. we'll get the american -- get c-span in the room. we'll get the american weighing in that's the rightning for america. >> greta: which dream -- democratic is strongest on your so side >> taylor, schumer has signed on my resolution before. there's a few democrats we've identified 37
was the one who gave seniors more prescription protection, i extended the life of medicare and capped out-of-pocket expenses. so there is a range of things that will become law. when the president signs this bill, not in four years, but immediately, we can campaign on. if we don't pass this bill it will live as a negative ka caricature in people's minds. >> here is my advice, it is free and maybe worth that. it seems this administration isser is sieved to be activist when it comes to government, progressive if you will. the only question and that question will be the same in november. the voters know that. do you believe trying to do good things at the federal level. the only question to the voters is not whether you are progressive or effective. if you succeed or not. >> right. >> you might as well go for it. thank you, david axelrod. >> thank you. >> thank you for coming on "hardball." >>> coming up, does scott brown's victory in massachusetts mean health care reform is dead or can the democrat come up with plan "b" to keep it alive. let's talk about it with howard dean, one of the guys
that medicare does not go bankrupt and there's a way to charge people 5.25% and up, allow us to buy into medicare and pay the full premium. there's a lot of healthy people to pay into medicare and it would counter balance all the older people using medicare and gove)nment insurance, health insurance funds. harry reed let us down on the healthcare reform and there's way - europeans have a gas tax to pay for healthcare. we use 84 million barrels of oil in this country a day. we could pay for healthcare by putting a dollar a tax on gasoline and harry reed let us down by not walking the walk. count less hours on that issue as well. app)eciate your comments on senator reid. roy, republican line. you're on c-span. good morning. caller: i love my country and all it's people so much. i'm so tired of groups being pitted against each other. this is simple when you think about it. the people who support god given free will verses those that don't and you call in and they tell you what you should and shouldn't talk about. that makes my point right there. sir, you can talk about anything you wa
the bill, they understand the taxes and half a trillion dollars cut in medicare. they get it. the bill is a loser and if it's a loser in massachusets, imagine what it is in missouri and mississippi and montana. jieg jieg -- gregg: i've got to stop you there. you're the guy that said coakley ran an abysmal campaign, deplete with joe biden like a gas every day, so would republicans miscalculate if they were to read this race as a microcosm of the larger national political mood? >> absolutely. first of all you have to understand how hard it is for a democrat to lose in massachusets. every congressman is a democrat. 90 percent of the legislature is democrat. she didn't run the hindenberg campaign, she didn't run a titanic campaign, she ran the hindenberg running into the titanic campaign. gregg: i think you're reading into much into it. >> i think republicans need a learn a lesson, scott brown, a republican that reflects local values, he's not a conservative, he's a new england republican, it is an easy to get, friendly guy. you can't be the most angry guy in the man and win. gregg: i'm g
on private insurance and people's ability to buy their own insurance and its effect on medicare, cutting medicare by trillions of dollars, if they want to at that time senate bill and ram it through the house and accepted it to the president to sign it, they have the votes right now. scott brown's election, if he's successful and hopefully he will be, won't change that. and clearly the leadership of the democratic party hasn't gotten the message because speaker pelosi said that today. that's what they intend to do. so you still have a government here in washington that's run by some folks from san francisco and other places who truly believe that if you dramatically grow the size of government, you create prosperity which certainly flies in the face of history. >> the stock market seems to be saying that the high tide of democratic pelosi, reid, obama, left liberalism, the high tide has been reached tonight and that now it will change that local atmosphere. your last thought on that. is the stock market right, senator gregg? >> the stock market usually is right because it's people puttin
and home care agencies accountable for the medicare regulations and the conditions of participation and that say that you must have a discharge plan in place, you must do this, you must do that. when i talk about having a providers, they looked at me and laughed. poor child, you do not understand. we do not have time to do that. that is regulations. why do we not make providers more accountable to do that? they just think it is not important. >> i can do a soap box, too. i wanted to say that i think the next policy step is the community choice act. i think the class act is good. it will mean that middle-class people will be encouraged to be prepared to take care of their long-term care needs or at least have been subsidized at some point in the future. as i said, half of the population need long-term care services lives in or near poverty. i do not think that population is very likely to pay into the program. in any case, a lot of people need services now. as long as the states have optional and not required home and community-based services, they will do what is happening in califo
it. you know, i've come on with you guys and i think we should have been much clearer about medicare. we understand how it works. it was a democratic initiative. this expanded five years or something like that. >> but, for instance, medicare for all. >> yeah. i mean, i think that that has been messaged very well and i also think let the senate and housework its will, that by definition is an unclear thing and muddled and the like. i also think something else. look, we're doing tough things. you're doing health care no matter who did it you're going to take a lot of lumps for it. i think you can critique how it's done, but there's no doubt the president is trying to solve the problems of the american people. the problem we have, this reminds us more of 1993. the president is doing incrementally good things but we in congress are taking our lumps every step of the way. and i also think when people who are against things are always more animated than people who are for things. there's a lot of headwinds. i don't want to do a postmortem until there's a mortem. >> this could be new hampsh
't raise taxes. i wouldn't cut medicare half a trillion dollars. and i wouldn't continually raise fees and do these backroom deals because it is not what the people want. they've spoken loud and clear they want transparency. they want to know what is in the bills. hopefully they will get it. >> reporter: interesting point. senator nelson of nebraska, we've all her about the -- heard about the cornhusker kickback are you prepared to tell senator nelson we to knock that off? >> i think he already knows. he's gotten that from his own delegation, the caucus they were outraged at that backroom deal. going in on one issue then came out with a deal that every state in the country was going to be subsidizing medicaid forever. it is not how people want to do business. they want a fair and free debate and know they are getting their money's worth by sending people down there who are going to represent their interests in a fair and open way >> reporter: what is your first priority when you hit washington you are going to hit the ground running? what the first priorities? >> i'm hopeful people giv
in the room. that is wrong. especially when looking at $50 billion cuts in medicare and 8% tax increases. looking to people who do have a health care plan. they want to tax them this, is wrong. we need people to have benefit of seeing what is going on behind closed doors. no secret deals. >> congressman, i know you need 218 votes. are you willing to tell us who refuses to sign it? i guess we can figure it out. any specific people? some people may try to dodge you. and can we get names of those that just say no? >> you can go to buchana buchanan.house.gov. there are 88 members and that is yesterday. and we're going to be looking for 218 votes. go to my web site. and look who signed and who hasn't. who hasn't especially if we need conservative democrats. if we can get to 218 we'll get c-span in the room and the american people weighing in. it's just the right thing for america. >> which democratic member of congress is strongest on your side on this? >> gene taylor is. shumer is signed on the resolution before. i think there is quite a few democrats we've identified 37 of them that are con
taxes, it will hurt medicare, it will destroy jobs and run our nation deeper into debt. >> we'll always remember our terrific senator ted kennedy and his words, the work begins anew, the hope rises again, and the dream lives on. >> we're breaking down this improbable win for the gop and its likely impact on health care reform. we've got the best political team on television this morning. suzanne malveaux, live at the white house with reaction from democrats who no longer enjoy a filibuster proof, but we start with jim acosta. it's such an irony, ted kennedy's dying wish was to see america's health care system overhauled and the seat goes to a republican who has completely different ideas. >> reporter: that's right, john. and democrats may hope that what happened in massachusetts stays in massachusetts, but that is not going to be the case if a remember in scott brown can campaign across this state saying he will vote against health care reform in what is a very liberal state, obviously the signs for the democrats, not good, coming up in these midterm elections as this campaign goes on,
? the biggest problem, what would you do? i wouldn't raise taxes. i wouldn't cut medicare half a trillion dollars. and i wouldn't continually raise fees and do these backroom deals because it is not what the people want. they've spoken loud and clear they want transparency. they want to know what is in the bills. hopefully they will get it. >> reporter: interesting point. senator nelson of nebraska, we've all her about the -- heard about the cornhusker kickback are you prepared to tell senator nelson we to knock that off? >> i think he already knows. he's gotten that from his own delegation, the caucus they were outraged at that backroom deal. going in on one issue then came out with a deal that every state in the country was going to be subsidizing medicaid forever. it is not how people want to do business. they want a fair and free debate and know they are getting their money's worth by sending people down there who are going to represent their interests in a fair and open way >> reporter: what is your first priority when you hit washington you are going to hit the ground running? what
medicare! it will destroy jobs! and run our nation deeper into debt! that's not anything to clap about because it's not in the interest of our state. it's nothing to clap about. it's not in the interest of our state, in our country. and we can do better! [cheers and applause] [chanting "yes, we can"] you know, when i traveled throughout the state, i've had a lot of fun. you guys are all having fun. [cheers and applause] so thank you. thank you. we have more of a show coming for you. so we are very excited. but when i'm in washington, i will work in the senate with the democrats and republicans to reform health care in an open and honest way. no more closed-door meetings, backroom deals. [cheers and applause] backroom deals with an out-of-touch party leadership. no more hiding costs, concealing taxes, collaborating with the special interests and leaving more trillions in debt for our children to pay. in health care we need to start fresh! we need to start fresh, work together to do the job right. and i hate to sound repettive, but once again we can do better! i will work in the senate t
a class action with two plaintiffs currently receiving medicare advantage and they are angry at the fact that there will be people in florida who will continue to receive it, and that is arbitrary and capricious actions creating two classes of people, and in violation of the constitution. host: we are going to leave it there because we are running short on time. this concern about taxing income? guest: he brings up a component that is in both the house and senate bills. they are calling into a limit loss ratio. essentially, there is a limited amount that insurance companies can charge for premiums, for anything other than what is going to patients. yes, that is a profit limit on insurers. that does not mean they cannot derive profit from other areas, investments they made. but in terms of actual premium dollars, there is a limit to the profit they can take from that. guest: he talked about court challenges. i wonder, if and when his health care passes, if this is more to end up in court and we will have court challenges for months and months. i can see this getting tied up in court for a
care, too much social security, too much medicare, too much power on the job, are actually inviting a repeat of 1994. >> moyers: is that exactly what happened when the republican scott brown defeated the democrat martha coakley in the massachusetts senate race? >> it was a wakeup call. and we were predicting that. we said, "look, they're angry. they're frustrated. and if you're not on the side of creating jobs, jobs, jobs. if they don't believe that, and you're not acting that on the scale that they think is necessary, you're going to face a bad time." and that's exactly what happened. >> moyers: the senate vote showed that 49% of union households in massachusetts voted for the republican. >> here's what they were saying. here's what our members were saying. here's what the general public said. here's what working america's saying. that wasn't about obama's agenda. they were saying, "you haven't overreached. you've under-reached. you haven't produced enough change. so, we're going to help you. you think the status quo's great. we'll show you." they want change. they want their probl
to the middle class. the way they can pay for it is by putting in a public option, expanding medicare or by raising taxes. i hope of those three options, they don't go with the raising taxes part. >> i get it. as a reporter who gets to talk to all of you people on a fairly regular basis, i've got to say, it's surprising sometimes to be able to talk to people like yourself and get honestly the exact same answer which goes to the point that you offered up, matt, which is transparency, and the end of corporate communism in this country. i think everybody can agree it's in america's interests without regard for what your political affiliations may be. what is the exclusion for all of us? to the valid anger, the understandable frustration, and real disappointment that we are seeing across america with our political process. well, the answer is, you. politicians will listen to what you say. and if they don't, vote them out of office. look what we're seeing here today. and if you have a phone, or an e-mail, or a twitter, or a facebook account, you have more access, more direction to your pol
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)